‘Russian roulette with my child’s education’

In Child Education | on May, 03, 2012 | by | 0 Comments

‘Russian roulette with my child’s education’
News from This is Cornwall:

ANGRY parents in Bodmin claim the local education authority is playing a game of “Russian roulette” in its allocation of school places for their children.

They say where their four and five-year-olds attend school has become a lottery.

Maria Majid applied for her daughter Evie to attend St Mary’s Catholic Primary School when she was just six weeks old, but four years later she has been told Evie must attend Berrycoombe School, even though she lives a stone’s throw from St Mary’s and currently attends the nursery.

Jo Camp is another furious parent who has failed to get a place for her child at St Mary’s, despite generations of her family being educated there.

Both parents say they will be lodging appeals to Cornwall Council to try and secure places at the Catholic school.

Mrs Majid said: “We have always wanted to have Evie educated at St Mary’s, which is why we put her name down a few weeks after she was born.

“On the allocation form I obviously put St Mary’s as my first choice and St Petroc’s as my second, only to be told Evie had been given a place at Berrycoombe School.

“She’s very happy at the playgroup at St Mary’s where all her fri…………… continues on This is Cornwall

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Can School Save A Child’s Life?
News from News Channel 7:

Parents have the option to enroll their children in school as early as four-years-old in Polk County, but North Carolina’s school age law doesn’t require kids to attend until the age of seven.

“It’s disheartening to know that so much could be prevented if children could be enrolled in an educational program earlier than age seven,” said Polk County Department of Social Services Director Lou Parton.

Parton is a member of the county’s Community Child Protection Team which tries to find ways to prevent children from becoming victims of abuse.

The team recently reviewed four child protective cases from 2011 and Parton says of the incidents may have been prevented had the victims been required to be in school.

Parton adds that one of the first indications that something is wrong with a student is when they miss an excessive number of days of school.  When that happens, officials can visit the home to see if the there is a problem.

As it stands now, schools don’t have that ability to mandate attendance if a child is younger than seven.

Parton and her team want the school age requirement to be lowered to age six to get those kids on the rolls sooner.

“Parents are more likely to be actively engaged in their child’s education the earlier it begins,” Parton said.

Some…………… continues on News Channel 7

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