No Child law loophole can mean fewer dollars for poor schools, study says

In Child Education | on August, 25, 2012 | by | 0 Comments

No Child law loophole can mean fewer dollars for poor schools, study says
News from MiamiHerald.com:

Across the country, black and Latino students are being shortchanged in state and local spending on schools because of a loophole in federal law, according to a study that crunched new data from the Department of Education.

The reason for the disparity is not just because of differences in property tax revenue among school districts. It has to do with how districts allocate their state and local education dollars.

The study by the Center for American Progress, a liberal policy research group, said that a “comparability loophole” in the federal education law specifically says that districts should not include teacher salary differences when they show how they comply with requirements to provide comparable education across all schools.

The loophole, contained in the 2001 No Child left Behind Act, states that while school districts don’t have to show that they spend equal amounts on all schools, they must show that they provide comparable educations.

But according to the study, “When veteran teachers elect to move to low-need schools in richer, whiter neighborhoods, they bring higher salaries to those schools. New teachers who tend to start out in high-need schools, serving many students of color and poor students, earn comparatively low salaries. This leads to significantly lowe…………… continues on MiamiHerald.com

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School Council representatives needed for 2012 to 2013
News from Wicked Local:

Even though summer is in full swing, it’s not too early to start thinking about next year and how you can make a difference in your child’s education. We are currently seeking candidates for the School Councils for the 2012-2013 school year.

Duties include: adopting goals for the school, identifying educational needs for students, reviewing the school’s budget, and formulating a school improvement plan.

Each School Council includes a parent and teacher from each grade level and a community representative who does not have a child at the school. The term is two years.

Fifteen positions are currently open.
Two kindergarten positions are open at Center School. Two 2nd grade positions and one 3rd grade position are open at Elmwood School.
Two positions are open in the 4th grade at Hopkins School, and one position each is available in the 6th and 8th grades at the middle school.
The high school requires one 9th grade representative and one 11th grade representative.
A community position is needed at Center, Elmwood, Hopkins, the middle school, and the high school – one per school.

If you’re interested in learning more about the School Council and the open positions and/or submitting your name as a candidate, please contact Lee Burns at schoolcouncil@hptaonline.com by August 24, 2012.

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