New Rye Business Brings Sophistication and Elegance to Child Education

In Child Education | on September, 23, 2012 | by | 0 Comments

New Rye Business Brings Sophistication and Elegance to Child Education
News from Patch.com:

Harrison resident Abbey Lombardo-Kumar aims help families in southern Westchester transform their child’s play spaces into elegant and sophisticated learning centers with her new business Little Learners Childhood Enrichment Studio on Purchase Street in Rye.

“We are trying to create an experience for people and teach people that you can have sophistication and elegance and still have children and be appropriate and accessible for children too,” Lombardo-Kumar said.

Little learners offers pre-school classes that go hand in hand with a “design to learn” philosophy, which focuses on bringing the positive learning environment that kids experience at the studio to the child’s home.

The space on Purchase street will be set up like a boutique and offer custom products including games, toys, art materials, children’s accessories, storage equipment, furniture and more.

“As a teacher I have always been asked, how can I bring the classroom home,” Lombardo-Kumaraims said. Little Learners helps to do that by offering home consultations where specialists will evaluate child play spaces and learning styles at home.

Lombardo-Kumar has worked in early childhood education for 10 years as a teacher, program coordinator and preschool director in Bronxville. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education and a Masters in Educational Studies wit…………… continues on Patch.com

… Read the full article
.
Related News:

.
The school district’s new five-year plan
News from Las Vegas Review – Journal:

Posted: Sep. 23, 2012 | 2:04 a.m.

In our public schools, a small number of hard-working kids, encouraged by parents who put an emphasis on achievement, continue to do well. Our trade and career high schools are another bright spot.

But at most government-run Las Vegas schools, as in most of urban America, results range from mildly disappointing to deplorable.

School reformers often talk of “raising the bar.” It’s a metaphor borrowed from track and field. Give the young high-jumper confidence by showing him or her how to get over a 5-foot bar. Then work on technique and strength training till the athlete can jump the 6-foot bar. Keep raising it.

That was the idea behind the federal education reform called “No Child Left Behind.”

When the program first went into effect, the bar was low: Only one-third of elementary kids needed to score at grade level in math for a school to “meet standards” in 2002-03. But then the bar was raised: Requirements gradually increased, until the standards call for 100 percent of students to demonstrate proficiency in math, reading and English by 2013-14.

Remember that part about “Work on technique and strength training”? Without that, eventually you reach the point where most kids just knock down the bar.

After a decade of easy stuff, “No Child Left Behind” was finally supposed to star…………… continues on Las Vegas Review – Journal

… Read the full article
.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Related posts:

  1. Tom Still column: Business seeing benefits of early education
  2. Michigan Business Leaders Say Early Childhood Education Matters to Economic Growth
  3. Lt. Gov. Simon brings college tour to COD
  4. Debbie Dingell and Michigan business leaders call for more focus on early …
  5. Trained child caregivers, critical to primary education
Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks