How to Interpret America’s Report Card

In Child Education | on October, 19, 2012 | by | 0 Comments

How to Interpret America’s Report Card
News from Huffington Post:

Last week, First Focus, a bipartisan advocacy organization, released a report on the condition of children in the United States. America’s Report Card 2012 presents data about how many, and what percentage of, U.S. children live in poverty, face food insecurity, lack stable housing, and so forth.

Amid many distressing facts, certain statistics jump out. Nearly a quarter of American children under age five live in poverty. More than 8 million children do not have regular access to adequate nutrition. Only 29 percent of eligible children ages 3-5 are enrolled in Head Start. Nearly 7 million youth between ages 16-24 are disconnected, i.e., not working or in school. The report gave America a C-, but that grade needs to be interpreted. Many children in America receive excellent upbringings, but many are raised in failing environments. Statisticians call this a bimodal distribution.

America’s Report Card 2012 sets itself the task of educating Americans about the status of its children, and in this respect it is a wake up call. But the report limits itself to the policy recommendation of “we must do…………… continues on Huffington Post

… Read the full article
.
Related News:

.
Academic goals shouldn’t depend on a child’s race
News from Orlando Sentinel:

When it comes to igniting an inferno, Molotov cocktails have nothing on race.

Last week, a firestorm blazed after the state Board of Education revealed new math and reading targets that use race to set student performance goals.

By 2018, the board expects 74 percent of black students and 81 percent of Hispanic students to be grade-level readers. That’s far short of the 88 percent of white students and 90 percent of Asian students the board counts on hitting that benchmark.

Likewise, math proficiency goals are pegged to race.

Board officials insist diverse goals simply acknowledge that because of myriad socioeconomic factors students come to school differently equipped.

Critics rightly consider stratified targets insulting — a move that channels what former President George W. Bush famously called the “the soft bigotry of low expectations.”

Florida was among 33 states and the District of Columbia granted exemptions from the No Child Left Behind law to set their own accountability goals.

Just as have Virginia and Washington, D……………. continues on Orlando Sentinel

… Read the full article
.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks

Related posts:

  1. The Education Report: Is failure to report child abuse in schools a matter of …
  2. Report: Illinois falls further behind ‘No Child’ education targets
  3. 2011 Policy Progress Report: No Child Left Behind
  4. Report: Florida Trailing Most States In Kids’ Health, Education
  5. BMI Appearing on Kids’ School Report Cards
Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks