UW education analysts: Don’t freeze college tuition, make the first two years free

In College Education | on April, 22, 2014 | by | 0 Comments

UW education analysts: Don’t freeze college tuition, make the first two years free
News from Madison.com:

Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal to extend a freeze on tuition at University of Wisconsin campuses misses the point, says UW-Madison associate professor Sara Goldrick-Rab: College is already too expensive for many families.

And Goldrick-Rab has a revolutionary idea to remedy that situation.

Use federal and state money now spent on an inefficient and inequitable financial aid system to provide free, to all qualified students, two years of education at any public university, college or community or technical college, argue Goldrick-Rab and associate professor Nancy Kendall.

“Outside of the top 25 percent of the income distribution, students all over the country now have to borrow or spend the equivalent of at least 15 percent of their family’s income for each year of post-secondary education, after taking all grants into account. For those seeking to spend those years at a four-year institution, borrowing or spending the equivalent of at least 25 percent of annual income is required,” Goldrick-Rab and Kendall write in a paper outlining their proposal.

Higher college costs, lower-paying part-time work and increasing rel…………… continues on Madison.com

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Supreme Court upholds ban on affirmative action in college admissions
News from STLtoday.com:

WASHINGTON • The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Michigan’s ban on using race as a factor in college admissions.

The justices said in a 6-2 ruling that Michigan voters had the right to change their state constitution in 2006 to prohibit public colleges and universities from taking account of race in admissions decisions. The justices said that a lower federal court was wrong to set aside the change as discriminatory.

Justice Anthony Kennedy said voters chose to eliminate racial preferences, presumably because such a system could give rise to race-based resentment.

Kennedy said nothing in the Constitution or the court’s prior cases gives judges the authority to undermine the election results.

“This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved. It is about who may resolve it,” Kennedy said.

In dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor said the decision tramples on the rights of minorities, even though the amendment was adopted democratically. “But without checks, democratically approved legislation can oppress minority groups,” said Sotomayor, who read her dissent aloud in the courtroom Tuesday. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sided with Sotomayor in dissent.

At 58 pages, Sotomayor’s dissent was longer than the combined length of the four opinions in support of the outcome. continues on STLtoday.com

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Related posts:

  1. How The Government Could Make Public College Free For All Students
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  4. Dean of Columbia College Resigns After Two Years
  5. Parents should establish expectations before shelling out college tuition
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