State schools chief: No more tests for high school graduation

In High School Education | on November, 16, 2014 | by | 0 Comments

State schools chief: No more tests for high school graduation
News from TheNewsTribune.com:

Washington state’s top education official wants to stop requiring students to pass high-stakes exams before they can graduate from high school, a proposal that would reverse years of standardized testing policy in the state.

The idea from state schools chief Randy Dorn comes as Washington schools are transitioning to a new set of standardized tests based on the Common Core State Standards. Under a plan approved by the Legislature last year, students in the class of 2019 and beyond will be required to pass the new Common Core-based tests in language arts and math to receive a high school diploma.

Dorn, the state superintendent of public instruction, wants to abandon that plan. His office estimates the state could save $ 30 million in its next two-year budget cycle by speeding up schools’ transition to the Common Core-based tests and not making them a graduation requirement.

For the next few years, school districts will be required to continue administering older-generation tests — end-of-course assessments and the state High School Proficiency Exam — on top of the Common Core-based tests. During the transition, high school students now in their junior year or below have to pass only one set of reading and math tests to graduate.

But Dorn said that administering both sets of tests is going to create serious logistical issues for school district…………… continues on TheNewsTribune.com

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Catoosa County high school’s RESPECT team volunteers to paint Habitat house
News from Rome News-Tribune:

Lakeview-Fort Oglethorpe High School’s RESPECT group is helping paint Catoosa County Habitat for Humanity’s most recent house.

These students are considered the best students overall at the high school, overseeing the Renaissance reward program. The program, launched at LFO in 1997, recognizes students with good grades, good behavior and good attendance, according to program sponsor Traci McCracken.

“Our RESPECT team is composed of the best students in our school and they are in charge of our Renaissance program,” McCracken said. “There is stiff competition to become a member of RESPECT, so students who have the best grades and also give back to their community are the ones who make the team.

“The RESPECT students participate in community service work at LFO and in the community and they sponsor several events at school,” McCracken said. “They help with Habitat for Humanity and also lend a helping hand at various events at local primary and elementary schools during the school year.”

Last year many of these same students volunteered at Habitat Way, where Catoosa Habitat builds the houses, for another project. They enjoyed the cause and…………… continues on Rome News-Tribune

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Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools
Is it possible for high-poverty schools to be high achieving? Of course it is! Real schools with students living in poverty do pos…
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